Svara på inlägget  Forumlista  ->  Racetech
Chassianalys av Ferrari 355
4 besök senaste veckan (36224 totalt) << Föreg. ämne | Nästa ämne >>
   
Johan6504
Göteborg



Här sen Apr 2004
Inlägg: 207


Trådstartare
Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  15 Okt 2009 14:04     Chassianalys av Ferrari 355 Citera

En artikel jag fått från en ferrari-kompis på nätet. Tänkte den kanske kunde utgöra lite intressant läsning på detta forum också...

Mitch rapporterar att denna artikel är "work in progress" och han kommer att skicka mig uppdateringar. Tror att han framför allt tittar på lite data jag bett honom komplettera artikeln med som relaterar till Ferrari 355 Challenge specen. I will keep you posted...

All credit for this analysis goes to Mitch Alsup! Mitch can usually be found at: http://www.ferrarichat.com

Concerning the suspension of the F355

This essay looks into the F355 suspension based on sound engineering principles. It will be assumed that the reader is familiar with the terms used to describe suspensions and suspension geometry.

Front suspension

The model used to analyze the front suspension of the F355 was constructed from a scan of that suspension from the Users Manual. The suspension pickup points have been measured to about 1/100dth of an inch. The data is read off and inserted into a 3D suspension analysis program in order to compute the caster, camber, and toe gyrations as the suspension moves in dive and roll.



Here we find the kingpin lateral inclination pointing directly at the center of the contact patch (red line), and the spring and shock assembly (blue line) pointing just inside the center of the contact patch. Having the kingpin lateral inclination point directly at the center of the tire contact patch means that there is no force directed to the steering linkage due to forces acting uniformly at the contact patch. This leads to a light steering effort, weighted only by the 7 degrees of caster. Notice, also, that the brake rotors are on the centerline of the contact patch so that braking forces are not directly coupled into the steering.

The drop linkage from the anti-roll bar and the lower A-arm intersects the control arm about midway. This means that the anti-roll bar must be 4 times as stiff as it would have been attached at the control arm pivot point, and that the control arm might suffer some deflection due to the anti-roll bar forces.

By observing the steering linkage arm versus the control arms, we see that there is some toe-in during compression and toe-out during extension. It would seem that raising the steering rack would moderate this effect. Lowering the front suspension will exacerbate this effect.

The next stage in the analysis is to take identical pairs of this suspension member and set them at the track defined track for this vehicle. This creates a full front suspension model. From here the suspension control points are extended until they meet at the instant center. The wheels will react to upward, downward, and roll movements as if they were attached to a single arm rotating at this instant center. A line drawn from this instant center to the contact patch will cross the center of the vehicle at its roll center. The following figure shows two of the above suspension images, placed at the appropriate track. Thus, the wheel will move as if it is rotating around the instant center, and the front end of the car will roll as if it were rotating around the roll center.



Here, we find that the instant center is approximately 300 inches away from the wheel, and that the roll center is ever so slightly below the surface of the road. Depending on whether you use math or use geometrical construction I got slightly different roll centers. -0.66" for the math version, -0.75" for the geometrical version. This is well within the measurement accuracy used to extract the suspension pivot points.

We can also see the front camber setting on the figure. I measured -0.8 degrees whereas factory front camber spec is -0.5 ± 0.1 degrees.

The front suspension has virtually no tire scrub because the roll center is almost at the surface of the road. The sum of these geometries means that the driver can get a very sensitive feel of the contact patch with minimal kickback or torque steer from braking. Loads are transmitted with minimal friction and maximum stiffness.

For completeness, on the right hand side of the image are the [X, Y] coordinates I measured for each suspension pivot point.

Rear Suspension

The rear suspension of the F355 is captured just like the front; as shown in the following figure:



The effective kingpin inclination intercepts outside the center of the tire; this gives mild compliance understeer under braking and mild compliance oversteer under power. Thus, the rear tire toes-in slightly under brakes, and toes-out slightly under power, the amount based on the compliance of the suspension bushings.

The spring and shock are aimed directly at the center of the contact patch, and thus have excellent control over it. The anti-roll bar attaches to the rear hub in the same longitudinal plane as the spring and shock. Thus the anti-roll bar (although mild) is fully damped by the shock.

As with the front, we take two of these rear suspension images, and set then at the proper track. From this point we can determine the instant center, and the roll center; as shown in the following figure.

on the right hand side of the drawing, one will find the suspension coordinates that I fed into a suspension analysis program. On the left hand side, I performed the geometrical construction of the suspension coordinates. Also note the various ride heights measured from the image.

At the rear we find that the roll center is some 4.76 inches above the road surface. This cause some jacking force at the rear of the car under lateral acceleration which lifts car at the roll center and thereby lifts the inside rear tire. Some of the softness of the F355 rear end is present to keep the inside rear tire on the road providing stabilizing traction while cornering. The inside rear tire is helped under lateral acceleration by the application of throttle which puts more weight on both rear tires. This weight transfer from the front also takes some traction off the outside front tire moderating power on oversteer.



Due to the height of the rear roll center, the rear suspension has about 20% more tire scrub under bump than under roll.

Roll axis

Since we have a roll center at the front and a roll center at the front, these two centers define the roll axis of the car. The following figure illustrates the roll axis of the car (red line) along with the ground clearance of the car (blue line).

The car will roll along the roll axis, since it is sloped towards the front, weight is transferred from the back to the front under lateral acceleration. Along with the rather stiff front anti-roll bar, this promotes mild understeer at high lateral acceleration.



Compared to the front being some 0.7 inches below the road surface and we have a roll axis that gains 5.4 inches from the front roll center to the rear roll center. The front roll center moves at almost the exact pace (1:1.01) as the ride height of the front. Those 300 inches instant centers provide this effect. However, in the rear the short 90 inch instant center distance means that the rear roll center moves 1.61 times as fast as the rear ride height. Thus small changes in the rear ride height move the rear roll center considerably, whereas similar small ride height in the front have little effect on the roll axis inclination.

Increase Track

Now let us consider what happens to these roll centers when spaces (or wheels with larger offsets) are added to the car. At the front the wider tract will lower the roll center which is already below the surface of the road, however the movement is minimal. At the rear, the effect is to raise the roll center, many times higher than the change at the front. Thus the roll axis is increased and the weight transfer to the front is increased while cornering. Thus, spacers induce understeer. Many drivers find this comforting.

At the front, the spacers put the center of the tire contact patch on the plane of the axel bearings. If anything, this reduces the load on these bearings. At the rear, the spacers move the center of the contact patch closer to the center of the wheel bearings and also reduce the bending moment on the bearing. Thus, spacers do not add but rather subtract from the loading on the wheel bearings.

With the standard wheels and factory specified tires {225/40ZR18 front and 265/40ZR18s at the rear}, spacers of 15mm will fit at the front and spacers of 25mm will fit at the rear. As the tire width is increased {(say) 245/35ZR18 front and 295/35ZR18 at the rear} the width of the spacers should be reduced so that proper wheel well clearance is maintained.

As one increases the track, there is less body roll since the track gets wider and the COG stays the same. This means the springs appear to be slightly softer on wider track cars.

Tires

Tires are the only point of contact (hopefully) between the car and the road surface. The tires transmit all of the power, braking and cornering forces to the road surface allowing the car to move (and stop). It is the duty of the suspension to hold the tires to the road surface while the chassis is moving to and fro, up and down, bobbing and weaving. If the tire is not in firm contact with the road surface, it can not transmit forces. Thus the whole job of the suspension is to keep the tire on the road.

An important property of tires is that they perform best a certain camber settings, and not quite as good at other camber settings. Let us be clear, here, these are the instantaneous camber with respect to the road surface, not the static camber numbers the suspension corner is adjusted to at an alignment. The following figure was scanned from a classical auto race car setup book and is used as a model for tires, traction, and the effects of camber on tire traction. {Although the data is from an old obsolete CanAm race tire, it is fairly representative of a modern wide low aspect ratio tire found on the F355 when normalized and used as relative traction guide.}



This tire model was curve fitted in an eXcel spreadsheet and then extended to ranges outside those shown. The curve fit model is shown in the following figures. On the left is the absolute tire traction model, and on the right traction has been normalized to unity.




The curve on the left when properly scaled will exactly overlay the original image.

Due to stability concerns at the limit, front tires end up with less traction overall and are more sensitive to camber; and this is especially true with mid engine and rear engine vehicles.

Camber Curves

Given the measured suspension coordinates, on can compute the camber movements in either longitudinal or lateral planes. One can plot these curves in various terms. I have found it useful to plot the curves based on the amount of tire movement in inches. This is a metric that is easy to grasp.

Here we see the output of camber for the front F355 suspension parts from the suspension analysis program, graphed in 3D form showing the relationship between dive, roll and camber.



The solid lines on the colored topography are those one would obtain if running the program in 2 dimensions holing either diver or roll fixed.

Notice that there can be as much as 7 degrees of camber change when the suspension is highly compressed or extended.

Given that we want the tires to operate in the realm of 0 degrees to minus 3 degrees of camber, there is an arc on this figure where the suspension should operate best. It is not clear how we find this arc, nor how we setup the suspension to stay close to the arc. That is the point of the essay.

Let us assume that the springs are setup to allow the car to roll a certain amount and to dive a certain amount as the chassis accelerates longitudinally and laterally. How much movement should the springs allow? A good guess is probably 1/2 of the ground clearance can be used spring effects for the car operating at its acceleration limit imposed by the tires. So, let us assume that this limit is 1.0 Gs of acceleration, in braking, cornering, and (when enough thrust is present) accelerating. Thus, the springs on an F355 should allow 2 inches of suspension movement at each corner for normal loadings, and reserve the other 2 inches of movement for bumps, potholes, curbs, and other road irregularities.

When we accept this 2 inch movement limit, we now find the F355 front suspension only has a range of +1.2 to -3.1 degrees of camber change. This range is about 1 degree outside of the optimal window for tire operation of 0 degrees through minus 2 degrees.

Next we see we see the output of camber for the rear F355 suspension parts from the suspension analysis program, graphed in 3D form showing the relationship between dive, roll and camber. We see that while the shape is similar its not quite the same. This will lead to interesting suspension characteristics later.



Under the same assumption of 2 inches of suspension movement we used at the front, we see that the rear has a maximum camber of +1.3 to -4.1 degrees. This is, again, a little wider than the optimal window for best traction. We will see some implications of this later in this essay.

At this point everybody is pretty much lost, but bear with me for a few more sections and I will get to the point. Part of the point is that the old way of looking at this stuff did not lead to an easy way to get your whole mind around the set of issues and deal with them in a rational manner. I purport that my new way of looking at this stuff does lead to a more natural way of looking at the issues and dealing with them (to a first order) rationally.

Traction curves

The camber graphs are what suspension engineers have been working with for years. However, what a driver feels is traction at the 4 contact patches. So, how can we get from a 3D camber graph into traction: Simple: use each point on the camber graph and apply the tire traction function.

The F355 front suspension curve from above has been passed through this tire traction function. The following is the traction graph that results. The top of the camber graph which was at the upper back is now at the upper right, the camber area between 0 degrees and -3 degrees is now representing the top of the traction curve. Similar to the large positive camber values, the large negative camber values have diminished traction.



Notice the shape is like a doughnut, and there is a particular surface where traction is best. Each color represents 1% of traction, so the burnt-orange is 99%-100%, then orange is 99%-98%, and so on.

What we would like to do is to set up the suspension so that the traction is always at the top of the traction graph. That, the tires are always positioned on the road for maximum traction. Given a suspension with no movement it is fairly easy to ride on the top of this traction surface. Unfortunately this can only be achieved with a suspension that is infinitely stiff or with an active suspension where the vertical forces on the tire are adjusted with hydraulic actuators (i.e. computer controlled suspension).

In the former case, the infinite spring rate means that weight is transferred off the inside tire immediately at the onset of lateral acceleration, and the outside tire does all the work. This leads to lower than optimal speed through corners.

In the later case, a computer is computing the force needed on the contact patch to prevent the suspension from moving. These systems worked so well they were almost immediately banned from racing.

Never-the-less, the F355 has a conventional suspension system of springs and shocks, even if the shocks are adapted by a computer. The forces on the contact patch are the sup of he spring and shock and in the long term controlled by the spring. The shock only has control over much time transpires before the spring controls the force on the contact patch.
The rear suspension traction surface is computed and illustrated in the following figure:



Traction Circle

This essay is based on street tires with a maximum capability to accelerate a car at 1.0 Gs longitudinally and laterally. It should be clear that one cannot use this 1 Gs of acceleration both longitudinally and laterally at the same time (giving 1.414 Gs of total acceleration). Instead, the vector sup of the lateral and longitudinal acceleration must remain below or at 1.0 Gs. This leads directly to the traction circle.

The following figure introduces the dimensions and illustrates the various controls the suspension setup engineer has to work with. First one sees that the stiffer the spring, the less the movement of the suspension under the same amount of force being applied by the tire. The figure shows a soft spring allowing 3 inches of suspension movement, a stiffer spring that allows only 2 inches of suspension movement. Finally, a soft spring with an anti-roll bar can make the suspension appear stiff in roll but remain soft in brake and acceleration directions.

Since weight is transferred off the inside wheels to the outside wheels in cornering we will end up being more concerned with the more heavily weighted outside tires than the inside tires. Secondly, excepting first gear, few cars have the ability to accelerate to the limits of the tire traction envelope could provide. However, almost all cars have enough brake capability to decelerate at the limits of the tires.



In the following figure I have added some traction path lines to illustrate the above features in realistic situations:



The blue line represents decelerating in a straight line, and then rolling the car into the turn while releasing the brakes and finally accelerating out of the turn with significant lateral acceleration, and finally being thrust limited accelerating down the following straight. This line is constructed from a vehicle without a roll bar.

The orange line represents decelerating in a straight line, rolling into a right hand turn with some acceleration, breathing the throttle as the driver rolls the car back into a left hand turn and then accelerates out of the turn and down the straight. This line is constructed from a vehicle with a roll bar.

Vehicle traction

Now that the concept of the traction surface has been introduced, it is time to bring a whole view of the car into focus. A car has 4 tires and 4 contact patched. It is the duty of the chassis to hold the suspension control arms and shock towers at constant locations. It is the duty of the suspension to adjust the forces on the contact patches suck that the tires never leave the road surface. With this in mind, the traction surfaces are flattened from 3D into 2D and attached to the F355 vehicle to that we can take these 4 traction surfaces and apply a single vector to all of them simultaneously. This vector is the direction of the COG of the car under that dynamic set of circumstances.



The reader will notice that the direction of the traction profiles have been adjusted. Deceleration (brake) is towards the front of the car, acceleration towards the rear, and lateral is towards the outside in the direction the car is acceleration away from.

It is now time to put the pieces together. In the following figure, the traction circle, and the two traction paths have been scaled and aligned to the operating condition of the F355 suspension.



The first observation one can derive from this figure is that there is a twitch in the F355 as it is steered into a turn while decelerating. The front end maintains its operating point on the surface of maximum traction, wile the rear end moves off the surface of maximum traction almost immediately, loosing some traction. However, as maintenance throttle is achieved (pure lateral acceleration) the front end sheds significant amounts of grip while the rear end gain grip. As acceleration ensues, the rear end gains even more grip. Since the F355 is thrust limited in all gears but first, the rear end is operating over its best possible traction profile while accelerating out of turns.

In both front and rear traction circles, the point of maximum braking corresponds to the point where the tire is about to leave the surface of best traction. Thus, if the car is lowered (moving the traction circle to the left on both surfaces in the above figure) there will be a minor loss of traction at the front with almost no loss at the rear. Thus the car will become unstable if lowered without increasing the spring rates to keep the traction circle on the surface of maximum traction. However, as the car is steered into a turn, the rear end will loose traction in a big way while the front will not loose traction until significant lateral acceleration has been achieved. This, also, makes the twitch larger and more nerve racking for the driver.

If more camber is added at the front (moving the traction circle downwards in the above figure) the twitch will become greater as the front end has more grip. If more camber is added at the back, the inside wheel looses traction and acceleration out of corners will suffer (by a minor amount).

If a stiffer front roll bar is used to bring the front traction path back up the traction map, the twitch will be come greater. {Remember this is only first order analysis, ignoring a lot of pertinent details.} If this stiffer anti-roll bar is accompanied by different tire contact patch sizes (thinner a the front) then balance may be reestablished.

Challenge Car

If you accept the above, you might immediately question why challenge car can be lowered, have camber added and the anti-roll bar changed. This question leads us to the next figure. Here, the traction curves are maintained (since they are part of the F355 geometry), but the challenge cars have stiffer springs and shocks. Thus the amount of suspension movement is smaller. Challenge cars also have tires with much greater traction (slicks) so the springs have been chosen to allow only 1 inch of suspension movement in response to 1.4-to-1.6 Gs of acceleration in any direction.

Here, we see the front end stiffened up by a factor of 3X and the rear end being stiffened up by 2.7X while the traction of the slick tires are capable of 1.5 Gs , the car has been lowered by 1 inch and 1 degree of rear camber has been added.



We see that the traction circles are perfectly centered on the top of the traction surface without a twitch, braking instability, and without loosing forward bite to accelerate out of turns.

F348

The early F348 rear suspension differs from the F348 Specialè in the chassis pick up points on the upper control arm are higher than on the Specialè and later F348s. This is illustrated in the following figure:



The upper chassis pick up point of the early F348 was between 0.6 and 0.7 inches higher on the chassis that the Specialè and later F348s. This change in pick up point is illustrative in suspension trade offs. The early F348s had a long moment arm from the distant instant center. This lowered the roll center and because of this, there was less weight transferred forward under lateral acceleration and the F348 got a reputation for twitchy handling.

So, then, why can a car like the Corvette C5 be lowered as much as 2" an camber added

Well, the Corvette has different geometry, and the doughnuts are shaped differently. The following picture shows the C5 Corvette traction profiles. Notice how long and wide they are. One can add up to 2 degrees of camber ate either end with only gains in performance. In addition one can raise or lower this suspension with little effect to the geometry.

ok, so why does Ferrari use such geometry?

At the front, the twitch I mentioned earlier can be controlled with ride height and camber to dial in as much or as little as the driver likes to control how quickly the car reacts to steering input. This makes the car lively under brakes and at steering initiation.

Notice that the Ferrari rear tractions curves are shaped such that traction is optimal when applying power and turning. In NASCAR parlance, this is 'forward bite' and what makes driving these things out of 100 MPH turns with you foot flat on the floor so much fun. They bite and carve big lurid arcs.

Taken together, the F355 suspension can be adjusted to whatever the driver likes with very tiny changes to its ride height and camber settings.

Notice the Corvette does not have this, and must resort to bigger tires (or stiffer springs and camber) to get reasonable amounts of forward bite. The bigness of the tires impacts the ability to ';dance' with the car.

All credit for this analysis goes to Mitch Alsup! Mitch can usually be found at: http://www.ferrarichat.com


_________________
Johan Lundberg

Ferrari 430 Scuderia -08
Porsche 911/991 GT3 -14
Volvo S90 T8 -18
Senast ändrad av Johan6504, 15 Okt 2009 16:53, ändrad totalt 3 gånger
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
Johan6504
Göteborg



Här sen Apr 2004
Inlägg: 207


Trådstartare
Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  15 Okt 2009 16:18     Citera

Det var i samband med att jag funderade på chassiuppgradering till 355:an som jag sprang på Mitch chassianalys. Tror att han gjorde den första upplagan för ca 4-5 år sedan. Han har nog filat på den några gånger sedan dess och många på ferrarichat.com har säkert läst den men få har nog förstått den helt och hållet.

Måste erkänna att jag är fortfarande lite bortkommen med alla termer och ideer men skal i alla fall försöka använde den i syfte att välja en lämplig chassifrekvens och dämparuppsättning till nästa år... Har ni kommentarer på detta är det naturligtvis roligt att höra och jag hoppas att ni som jag lär er något nytt.


_________________
Johan Lundberg

Ferrari 430 Scuderia -08
Porsche 911/991 GT3 -14
Volvo S90 T8 -18
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
henningo
Denver, CO, USA



Här sen Okt 2004
Inlägg: 238



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  15 Okt 2009 18:58     Citera

Skummade snabbt igenom,

Staller mig klart tveksam till denna (omfattande) analys. Att dra slutsatser om bilens dynamik genom att enbart titta pa kinematiken (camberkurvor i detta fall) och friktionskoefficient som funktion av enbart cambervinkel ar sloseri med tid enligt min mening och kan inte anvandas till nagot matnyttigt. Det finns betydligt battre (och enklare) satt som ger battre resultat.

Varfor? Lastvaxling och normalkraftens paverkan pa dacken for att namna nagra fa anledningar.


_________________
Henning Olsson
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Besök användarens hemsida
Fredrik Peterson
Stockholm



Här sen Okt 2006
Inlägg: 13



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 13:22     Re: Citera

henningo skrev:
Det finns betydligt battre (och enklare) satt som ger battre resultat.


Det vore intressant att höra vad du syftar på. Kanske kan du länka till något exempel.


_________________
Fredrik Peterson
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande
Johan6504
Göteborg



Här sen Apr 2004
Inlägg: 207


Trådstartare
Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 14:16     Citera

Jag skulle gärna vilja veta om det är något som ni uppfatar som direkt felaktigt. Speciellt resonemanget kring geometrin och hur det hänger ihop med uppträdande m.m.


_________________
Johan Lundberg

Ferrari 430 Scuderia -08
Porsche 911/991 GT3 -14
Volvo S90 T8 -18
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
Magnus Thomé
Stockholm



Här sen Nov 2002
Inlägg: 33408

Forumägare
Forumägare

Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 14:33     Citera

Mer rätt eller mer fel gör ju inte hela världen, det är ju tveklöst ett bra underlag för diskussion (om vad som stämmer bra och vad som kanske är t.ex för förenklat). Eller hur?


_________________
Magnus Thomé
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
Johan6504
Göteborg



Här sen Apr 2004
Inlägg: 207


Trådstartare
Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 14:42     Re: Citera

Magnus Thomé skrev:
Mer rätt eller mer fel gör ju inte hela världen, det är ju tveklöst ett bra underlag för diskussion (om vad som stämmer bra och vad som kanske är t.ex för förenklat). Eller hur?


Ja det har du ju rätt i :-)
Jag hoppas i alla fall att flera vågar sticka ut hakan och kommentera men det kanske kommer när det sjunkit in lite mer...


_________________
Johan Lundberg

Ferrari 430 Scuderia -08
Porsche 911/991 GT3 -14
Volvo S90 T8 -18
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
Göran Malmberg
Bromma



Här sen Feb 2003
Inlägg: 3893



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 19:09     Re: Citera

Johan6504 skrev:
Magnus Thomé skrev:
Mer rätt eller mer fel gör ju inte hela världen, det är ju tveklöst ett bra underlag för diskussion (om vad som stämmer bra och vad som kanske är t.ex för förenklat). Eller hur?


Ja det har du ju rätt i :-)
Jag hoppas i alla fall att flera vågar sticka ut hakan och kommentera men det kanske kommer när det sjunkit in lite mer...

Tja, jag vet inte i vilken ende man skulle börja för att gå i svaromål på detta. Det är så omfattande att jag inte för allt smör i småland vill ge mig på det. Vill man ha ett svar så har jag min nya "Banbilsboken" på nära 400 sidor A4, där jag tar upp rollcenter problematiken som en bland alla andra detaljer som inverkar bilens uppförande. Race Car Engineering ventilerade detta i nyligen i några nummer där Danny Nowlan (Carsim)
gör sin analys och Mark ortiz går i svaromål. Det som ventileras påminner inte så värst mycket om det om säg i Ferrari artikeln. Jag har själv KÖRT med alla upptänkliga geometrier och även haft OLIKA geometri på vänster och höger sida av bilen för att kunna svänga vänster o höger å direkt känna skillnaden, vilket det förefaller som författaren inte gjort. Med det menar jag inte att författaren har fel i sak, utan i proportion.
Hur som helst så går det inte att bemöta en sådan här skrivelse i ett forum utan de som är intresserade får läsa böcker i ämnet och själv bilda sig en uppfattning om hur det kan ligga till. Så stort är ämnet för artikeln. Jag kan säga som exempel att Corvettens geometri inte redogörs för i sin helhet vilket är av nöden i just en C6:as fall då antidive o antisquat inte är tillnärmelevis lika en Ferrari.
mvh
Göran


_________________
Hemipanter Göran Malmberg
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Besök användarens hemsida
Enzo Molinari
Gävle



Här sen Dec 2004
Inlägg: 246



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 19:15     Citera

Äntligen inser jag hur lite jag förstår om chassiedynamik.


_________________
Michael Lindh
leg. bildåre
projekt mittmotormonster: Dallara X1/9 "Il Bastardo"
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande
fuling
Stockholm/Bromma



Här sen Jan 2003
Inlägg: 8089

Hjälpmoderator

Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  16 Okt 2009 20:56     Citera

Citat:
Äntligen inser jag hur lite jag förstår om chassiedynamik.


Välkommen i klubben


_________________
MVH Johan Sjölinder
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande
Jonas Alfredson
Lerum



Här sen Aug 2006
Inlägg: 33



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  18 Okt 2009 13:59     Citera

Först och främst måste jag efter en väldigt översiktlig genomgång av denna analys helt och fullt instämma i henningo's skepsis kring dess egentliga värde.


Sedan som svar på trådöppnarens fråga om det finns några direkta felaktigheter i inlägget. Ja det gör det,
och jag kan bidra med ett belysa ett par:

Författaren av analysen skriver om att senare 348:or har fått sänkta chassieinfästspunkter för övre länkarmar bak, vilket mycket riktigt höjer rollcentrum som synes av bilden.
Gällande layouten av den äldre 348:an skriver författaren då

Citat:
....This lowered the roll center and because of this, there was less weight transferred forward under lateral acceleration and the F348 got a reputation for twitchy handling.


Till replik på detta påstående vill jag först och främst säga att det är fysikaliskt omöjligt att via latarel acceleration förflytta vikt (eller bättre uttryckt, belastning/load) i longitudinell riktnig såsom här beskrivs.
Hur det verkligen hänger ihop är att ett sänkt rollcentrum bak gör att den kinematiska delen av rollstyvheten minskar bak och därmed att den totala rollstyvheten sjunker hos bakvagnen. Om inga andra ändringar görs kommer naturligtvis den totalla krängningen att öka något men framförallt så kommer proportionellt sett, framvagnen att ta en större del av krängningsmomentet vilket i sin tur medför att framhjulens normalkrafter blir mer differentierade medan bakhjulens dito blir mer jämnbelastade. Detta sammantaget leder ganska säkert till att ballansen ändras mot det mer understyrande hållet. Sedan kommer förstås även det som artikelförfattaren nästan uteslutande fokuserar på också in i bilden, nämligen huruvida den, i det här fallet något ökade krängningen, eventuellt försämrar cambervinklarna mer hos den ena axeln än den andra vilket i sin tur kan öka eller minska nämnda tendens mot understyrning eller i extrema fall rentav "overrida"den ifall bakhjulens cambervinklar riktigt ballar ur. (detta kräver dock en riktigt dålig grundgeometri eftersom mitt exempels ökade krängning knappast lär bli speciellt stor.)
Det här blev ju betydligt längre svamlande än planerat men jag vill med detta belysa att it's much more to it than just camber angles. Missförstå mig rätt nu, jag är den förste att medge att utan ordning på cambervinklarna blir det ingen ordning på väghållningen heller.

Vid en ny genomskummning av den övre delen av artikeln upptäckte jag under rubriken "Roll axis" samma felaktighet i en mer ren form, uttryckt som en sanning huggen i sten.
Citat:
The car will roll along the roll axis, since it is sloped towards the front, weight is transferred from the back to the front under lateral acceleration. Along with the rather stiff front anti-roll bar, this promotes mild understeer at high lateral acceleration.


Påståendet kring effekten av lutningen på "roll axis" är rent nonsens och som redan beskrivet så är hans slutsats också felaktig. Dvs det är bara den styva krängningshämmaren som leder till understyrningen och inte ett högre rollcentrum bak som i själva verket leder till mindre understyrning.


Tyvärr är det inte slut på felaktigheter med det här, när den gode Mitch ska förklara att camberkontroll är enkel om man utesluter "suspension movement" men att det medför andra problem så trasslar han in sig i resonemang som han inte riktigt förmår reda ut.

Citat:
Unfortunately this can only be achieved with a suspension that is infinitely stiff or with an active suspension where the vertical forces on the tire are adjusted with hydraulic actuators (i.e. computer controlled suspension).

In the former case, the infinite spring rate means that weight is transferred off the inside tire immediately at the onset of lateral acceleration, and the outside tire does all the work. This leads to lower than optimal speed through corners.


Krängstyvhet kan sägas bestå av tre delar; en kinematisk del som kommer ifrån hjulupphängningens geometri, bestående exempelvis av anti-roll från ett högt roll centrum, en annan del kommer ifrån dämparna och består av det motstånd som dämparkolven genererar på sin väg genom hydraulvätskan (hastighetsberoende), den tredje delen består är den elastiaka och består av den kraft som fjädrarna genererar (lägesberoende). utöver dessa tre har vi även en istort sett oönskad nämligen den friktion som oundvikligen genereas i hjulupphängningsleder dämparkropp mm.

Författaren hävdar dels att ytterhjulet får göra hela jobbet vilket naturliftvis inte är sannt, åtminstone inte förrän innerhjulen är i luften. Han hävdar ochså att oändligt styva fjädrar fixar load transfer "immediately"
vilket naturligtvis inte heller är sannt. För att reda ut hur det förhåller sig i verkligheten skrev jag medvetet
ovan nämnda tre komponenter i krängstyvheten i den ordning jag gjorde pga att det är i den ordning som de påverkar chassierörelsen. Dvs, den kinematiska delen är den som faktiskt gör sin del immediatelly, detta gör den genom att en del av däckens laterala krafter, vid rollcentrum över vägbanan, fortplantas genom länkarmarna in i chassiet redan innan en eventuell rörelse startar, dämparna reagerar också tämligen snabbt men dess motstånd är som nämnts hastighetsberoende och motståndet genereras således inte innan rörelsen startat såsom den kinematiska delen gör. (Vid små inputs kan kraft uppstå innan rörelse, detta är dock beroende på statisk friktion i leder mm. eller i själva dämparen sk. striction). När det sedan gäller fjädrarna så utgör de det långsammaste sättet att effektuera "load transfer" eftersom de måste tryckas ihop för att deras kraft ska öka, denna hoptryckning blir naturligtvis mindre och mindre ju styvare de är och vid oändligt styva fjädrar som författaren nämner blir ju denna ahoptryckning oändligt liten eller annorlunda uttryckt obefintlig. Men eftersom vi befinner oss i verkligheten kan man direkt konstatera att om man helt plockar bort fjädrarna så flexar chassiet desto mer och om det mot all förmodan kan styvas upp till att inte flexa så måste ytterhjulens däck squachas ut till att få nästan dubbelt så stor "contact patch" (nästan eftersom lufttrycket i det belastade däcken kommer att öka något men också för att en liten del av lasten även kommmer att bäras av däckstommens egen styvhet). Kontentan är hursomhelst att krängningen måste nå sin sin slutliga punkt innan hela den elastiska delen av krängningsmotståndet kan räknas in.


Nedan kommer ytterligare en något tveksam formulering, ärligt talat förstår jag inte exakt vad han vill ha sagt men jag skulle nog själv uttrycka det något i stil med. "om man ökar spårvidden utan att höja COG så minskas lateral load transfer". Detta är ju den intressanta biten och den jag misstänker att han faktiskt syftar på. Sedan beror det ju på om man breddar chassiet mellan hjulupphängningen sas eller om man sätter på spacers och på så sätt ändrar "MR ie. motion ratio", ifall bilen därav kränger mer eller inte.

Citat:
As one increases the track, there is less body roll since the track gets wider and the COG stays the same. This means the springs appear to be slightly softer on wider track cars.



Även här gick jag just tillbaka till rubriken "Increase Track", hade vid första skummningen bara klistrat in den avslutande meningen eftersom det kändes som han missade målet. I stycket ser man ju att det han belyser är just att bredda vid fälgarna sas. Detta innebär som sagt att MR ändras. Jag orkar ärligt talat inte tänka igenom detta så noga just nu men det innnebär hursomhelst att bilen kommer att bli något mjukare i "ride" och således även ligga något lägre statiskt, däremot lär väl krängningen bli praktiskt taget oförändrad. eller.



Jag påstår mig inte sitte inne på någon absolut sanning i ovanstående ämne men har hur som helst efter vad jag tror är riktigt försökt att slå hål på några potentiellt vilseledande påståenden.

Mvh Jonas[/quote]


_________________
//Jonas Alfredson

Opel Speedster TURBO
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande
henningo
Denver, CO, USA



Här sen Okt 2004
Inlägg: 238



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  19 Okt 2009 20:13     Citera

Tack Jonas for att du tog dig tid till att svara och ett bra svar dessutom! (Nu behover inte jag skriva lika mycket).

Nar jag far nagon timme over sa ska jag visa varfor hans dacksmodell och hur han anvander den ar i princip helt vardelos.


_________________
Henning Olsson
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Besök användarens hemsida
Johan6504
Göteborg



Här sen Apr 2004
Inlägg: 207


Trådstartare
Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  19 Okt 2009 20:26     Citera

Ni som förstår huvud delarna av resonemenget, finns det något i denna artikel som man kan ta fasta på? Jag vill ju egentligen bara komma underfund med hur jag skall ta ett lämpligt nästa steg för min bil så att den gör sig bättre på bana. Är ju samtidigt nyfiken på hur jag skall resonera kring de grundläggande faktorerna i chassit och vad som påverkar vad vid förändringar...


_________________
Johan Lundberg

Ferrari 430 Scuderia -08
Porsche 911/991 GT3 -14
Volvo S90 T8 -18
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Skicka e-post
Göran Malmberg
Bromma



Här sen Feb 2003
Inlägg: 3893



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  19 Okt 2009 22:22     Re: Citera

Johan6504 skrev:
Ni som förstår huvud delarna av resonemenget, finns det något i denna artikel som man kan ta fasta på? Jag vill ju egentligen bara komma underfund med hur jag skall ta ett lämpligt nästa steg för min bil så att den gör sig bättre på bana. Är ju samtidigt nyfiken på hur jag skall resonera kring de grundläggande faktorerna i chassit och vad som påverkar vad vid förändringar...


Du åker alltså 355? Jag tycker vi skippar i hela det där resonemanget och resonerar utifrån din bil och dig själv i stället. Synd att du bor i Göteborg annars hade det bästa varit att träffas och gå igenom det hela med papper o penna. Rent allmänt så är jag inne på en personlig inställning utav bilen, och val av rätt däck. Skysta stötdämpare som är justerbara är ett stort plus. Det är inget fel på geometrin i övrigt på bilen, den är likadan på de flesta Italienska sport bilar med små skillnader, så där e de ingenting som e ide å ändra på i alla fall.
Beroende på hur allvarligt du vill köra så kan man troligen sänka bilen lite, men då får man titta närmare på fjädringen o däcks fälg valet.

Vad gäller jämförelsen med Corvette så har jag en rätt komplett måttskiss på min hemsida www.hemipanter.se ungefär mitt på sidan, där e Viperns mått med åxå. Skulle tro att ni andra som svarat lite mer ingående här får en tanketällare vad gäller författarens jämförelsen med C5:an vid en betraktelse.
mvh
Göran


_________________
Hemipanter Göran Malmberg
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Besök användarens hemsida
Jonas Alfredson
Lerum



Här sen Aug 2006
Inlägg: 33



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  20 Okt 2009 17:45     Citera

Hej igen,

Tack för komplimangen Henning.

Johan, som Henning skrev redan i sitt första korta inlägg så fokuseras i artikeln enbart på cambervinklarna. En mycket viktig sak som i princip helt undveks är det faktum att däckens förmåga att generera krafter i lateralplanet är, inte helt men dock i närheten därav, linjärt beroende av normalkraften (dvs däckens tryck vinkelrätt mot vägbanan). Ska man överhuvudtaget diskutera däckens fäste och bilens balans under dynamiska förhållanden måste man titta på hur dessa normalkrafters inbördes fördelning ser ut och ändras vid olika manövrar. Detta är ungefär så mycket som jag hinner skriva om detta just nu (dessutom väntar vi väl alla med spänning på Hennings fortsättning). Jag tror inte sista ordet är sagt i detta ämne and by the way jag bor mycket närmare Göteborg än Göran...

Göran, jag tog en snabb titt på dina geometriskisser och tror mig förstå vad du syftar på men måste också säga att min personliga inställning till anti-dive i framvagnen (i detta fall ca. ca. 50% ) är att det kan ge ganska stora nackdelar vid hård bromsning om inte underlagen är väldigt jämn och fint. Däremot när det gäller anti-squat så ökar ju till och med följsamheten i bakvagnen vid gupp (såväl vid bromsning som acceleration) så det kan man tollerera i betydligt högre utsträckning (contact patch måste dock röra sig både fram och tillbaka under oscillering så man vill ändå inte ha för mycket). Enligt min åsikt ser väl Corvetten okay ut i detta avseende men är du säker på att Vipern verkligen är som du skissat? Den kommer ju till ockh med resa sig bak under acceleration.


Måste sticka!

Mvh

Jonas


_________________
//Jonas Alfredson

Opel Speedster TURBO
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande
Göran Malmberg
Bromma



Här sen Feb 2003
Inlägg: 3893



Tipsa Facebook   Inlägg  20 Okt 2009 18:26     Re: Citera

Jonas Alfredson skrev:

1
Göran, jag tog en snabb titt på dina geometriskisser och tror mig förstå vad du syftar på men måste också säga att min personliga inställning till anti-dive i framvagnen (i detta fall ca. ca. 50% ) är att det kan ge ganska stora nackdelar vid hård bromsning om inte underlagen är väldigt jämn och fint.
2
Däremot när det gäller anti-squat så ökar ju till och med följsamheten i bakvagnen vid gupp (såväl vid bromsning som acceleration) så det kan man tollerera i betydligt högre utsträckning (contact patch måste dock röra sig både fram och tillbaka under oscillering så man vill ändå inte ha för mycket).
3
Enligt min åsikt ser väl Corvetten okay ut i detta avseende men är du säker på att Vipern verkligen är som du skissat? Den kommer ju till ockh med resa sig bak under acceleration.

Mvh

Jonas

1
Jag har ju min "zerocar" filosofi, så Speedlabcorvetten har inga såna där antivinklar. Vi vill kunna bromsa med bilen.
2
När det gäller acc (Dr) så använder man detta och kallar det "rise", alltså att bilen lyfter-jackar. Sen har man mjuka fjädrar och reglerar utfjädringen med returen på dämparna. På så vis kan man reglera fastsättningen av däcken i starten. Men sedan får man betala med sämre grepp längre fram på strippen i högfartgreppet.
3
Corvettens siffror kommer från Corvette själva medan Viperns har jag mätt själv, och det är noggrant gjort kan jag försäkra. Men när man tittar på Ferrariskissen så undrar jag hur man räknat snitten i raminfästningarna vad gäller Ic? Sedan är ju Vipern och Corvetten mycket soft vertikalfjädrade för komfortens skull sedan grejar man genomslagskollaps med anti.

Jag tror att Vipergubbarna på USA maner siktat in sig på 1/4 milstider. Sätter man på riktiga däck för ändamålet så kan man få ett grymt startgrepp, å detta är mycket tungt kort däröver. Alltså åka fort som orginal, utan att bygga om till fyrlink. Ferrari får nog besvär där. Däremot så är den tämligen hoppig och allmänt störig med vägdäck när man accar, eller så spinner man bort sig.
Göran


_________________
Hemipanter Göran Malmberg
Racetech
Upp            Tillbaka
Visa användarens profil Skicka personligt meddelande Besök användarens hemsida
Svara på inlägget  Forumlista  ->  Racetech
Chassianalys av Ferrari 355
4 besök senaste veckan (36224 totalt) << Föreg. ämne | Nästa ämne >>






Från request till första response:
sec (varav server render 0.203 sec)
Webbrowser render:
sec